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August 2009

This issue of Yoga focuses on Swami Sivananda’s teachings on prana and pranayama.

High on Waves

What is Prana?

What is Pranayama?

Importance and Benefits of Pranayama

Practices of Pranayama

Seven Classical Pranayamas

Pranayama for Awakening Kundalini

May I Answer That?

Prana and Pranic Healing

Instructions on Pranayama

Four Stages of Attainment

Spiritual Vibrations and Aura



Prana and Pranic Healing

The breath, directed by thought under the control of the will, is a vitalizing, regenerating force which you can utilize consciously for self-development, for healing many incurable diseases in your system, for healing others and for other various useful purposes. Those who practise pranayama can impart their prana to others for healing and also recharge themselves with prana in no time by practising kumbhaka. Never think that you will be depleted of your prana by distributing it to others. The more you will give, the more it will flow to you from the cosmic source, hiranyagarbha. That is the law of nature.

If there is a rheumatic patient, gently massage his legs with your hands. When you do the massage, do kumbhaka and imagine that the prana is flowing from your hands towards your patient. Connect yourself with hiranyagarbha or the cosmic prana and imagine that the cosmic energy is flowing through your hands towards the patient. The patient will at once feel warmth, relief and strength.

You can cure headache, intestinal colic or any other disease by massage and by your magnetic touch. When you massage the liver, spleen, stomach or any other portion or organ of the body you can speak to the cells and give them orders: “O cells! Discharge your functions properly. I command you to do so.” They will obey your orders. They have subconscious intelligence too. Repeat your mantra when you pass your prana to others. Try this in a few cases and you will gain competence.

You can have extraordinary power of concentration, strong will and a perfectly healthy, strong body by practising pranayama regularly. You will have to direct the prana consciously to unhealthy parts of the body.

Suppose you have a sluggish liver. Sit in padmasana, close the eyes and practise sukha purvaka pranayama. Direct the prana to the region of the liver and concentrate your mind there. Fix your attention on that area and imagine that prana is interpenetrating all the tissues and the cells of the lobes of the liver and doing its curative, regenerating and constructive work there. Faith, imagination, attention and interest play a very important part in curing diseases by taking prana to the diseased areas. During exhalation imagine that the morbid impurities of the liver are thrown out. Repeat this process 12 times in the morning and 12 times in the evening. Sluggishness of the liver will vanish in a few days.

You can take the prana to any part of the body during the pranayama and cure any kind of disease, be it acute or chronic.

Distant healing

You can transmit prana through space to a friend who is living at a distance, provided there is a receptive mental attitude. You must feel yourself en rapport (in direct relation and in sympathy) with the people who you are healing.

You can fix the hour of appointment with them through correspondence. You can write to them: “Get ready at 8 pm. Have a receptive mental attitude. Lie down in an easy chair. Close your eyes. I shall transmit my prana.”

Say mentally to the patient, “I am transmitting a supply of prana” and when you send the prana, practise kumbhaka and rhythmical breathing also. Mentally imagine that the prana is leaving your mind, passing through space, and is entering the system of the patient. The prana travels unseen like the wireless (radio) waves and flashes like lightning across space. Afterwards, you can recharge yourself with prana by practising kumbhaka. This requires long, steady and regular practice.

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